Friday, November 30, 2007

The Symptoms Of Menopause

Overall, medical professionals agree that there are at least 37 indicators of menopause, ranging from the mild and easy-to-overlook, to the more dramatic and potentially disruptive to your lifestyle. While the average age of onset for menopause is between 50 and 52, bear in mind that most women start experiencing the symptoms several years beforehand. Here is brief information about the more common symptoms, followed by a list of the remaining ones. When you read this, don?t be worried. Every one is merely a sign that your body is functioning like a normal woman?s body should!

1. Hot or cold flushes:

Many women report having hot of cold flushes, as well as feelings of associated clamminess or sweatiness. Indeed the hot flush has become one of the more ?stereotypical? signs of menopause. Both hot and cold flushes reflect a change in your body?s internal thermostat, a factor that is regulated by the hypothalamus. During menopause, less estrogen is produced by the ovaries. The hypothalamus detects this drop in estrogen levels, and responds by altering your body?s temperature hence causing these otherwise unexplained feelings of hotness or coldness.

2. Periods of rapid or irregular heart rate:

This is one of the lesser-known and more frightening symptoms of menopause. In fact, some women say they feel as if they are having heart failure, palpitations, or a panic attack. Despite research into this matter, the medical community has no clear answer as to why heart arrhythmia occurs in some menopausal women. It often begins during the lead-up to menopause proper (during the ?peri-menopause? phase) and naturally it causes concern. It is important to report this symptom to your physician to eliminate other, potentially more serious causes.

3. Moodiness, ill temper and feelings of irritability:

See-sawing emotions can make menopausal women feel as if they are on a rollercoaster they can?t control. Like pre-menstrual-syndrome, feelings of irritability or moodiness during menopause are very common and easily explained. They are caused by natural hormonal fluctuations. Most women learn to cope with mood swings by doing regular exercise, or performing relaxation techniques such as meditation, and yoga.

4. Becoming easily upset and teary:

Because their hormones are changing so dramatically, menopausal women can also find they become teary and emotional at the drop of a hat, and sometimes for no reason at all. Again, dealing with unpredictable mood swings isn?t easy but by learning coping mechanisms, such as breathing exercises and relaxation techniques, you can start to lessen the impact.

5. Disrupted or disordered sleeping patterns:

For various reasons, menopausal women can often develop calcium deficiencies. Because calcium acts as a sedative on the human body, this deficiency can lead to restlessness, an inability to fall to sleep, as well as poor sleeping patterns throughout the night. Naturally, this can be extremely frustrating and tiring for women. Not surprising, a lack of quality sleep can also compound other problems such as feeling emotional or experiencing moodiness. The answer for many women is a calcium supplement, as well as engaging in gentle relaxation exercises to help them better sleep.

6. Unusual or irregular menstrual cycles, including lighter or heavier bleeding:

Since menopause is the cessation of menstruation, it seems self-evident that women would experience changes to their menstrual cycle, finally culminating in a failure to menstruate at all. What women might not know is that disturbances to their periods can occur well before menopause begins. Indeed some women report unusually long or short periods, different bleeding patterns, as well as skipped periods well before menopause takes place.

7. Decrease or loss of libido:

With menopause comes a decrease in hormonal levels, including a drop in estrogen levels. This can cause a reduction in libido or lowered interest in sex. That said, some research points out that although many menopausal women report having a lower libido, their level of sexual activity nevertheless remains steady, suggesting the relationship between normal menopausal hormonal changes and libido is a complex one.

8. Vaginal dryness:

As mentioned earlier, menopause involves a reduction in estrogen. Estrogen is the so-called ?female? hormone, which amongst other things, is responsible for maintaining healthy, supple vaginal tissue and lubrication. When estrogen drops, as it does during menopause, this leads to vaginal dryness. An unfortunate consequence can be painful sexual intercourse.

9. Gastrointestinal problems, such as nausea, indigestion, gas and bloating:

Many women aren?t aware that balanced hormones help keep their gastrointestinal tract functioning normally. Indeed, it?s not until there is an imbalance (such as there is during menopause) that they come to realize how important hormones are to digestion. For instance, estrogen is a stimulant for the gastrointestinal tract, and therefore the drop in estrogen levels can cause any number of symptoms, such as gas, constipation, diarrhea and indigestion. Likewise changes to progesterone levels during menopause can cause disruptions to your usual bowel patterns. Menopause also places pressure on your liver, leaving it less energy to do its usual cleansing duties.

Other symptoms of menopause include:

10. Anxiety
11. Morbid thoughts and feelings of dread and apprehension
12. Mental vagueness and inability to concentrate
13. Memory loss
14. Incontinence and ?frequency? of urination
15. Unusual sensation on one?s skin, such as phantom itches, and crawling skin
16. Sore joints
17. Muscle tension and soreness
18. Tender breasts and hypersensitive nipples
19. Headaches and migraines
21. Feeling bloated
22. Depression
23. Changes to, or worsening of, existing health problems
24. Exacerbation of allergies
25. Weight gain and metabolic imbalances
26. Thinning or loss of hair on the head
27. Increase in facial hair
28. Giddiness, loss of balance and light-headedness
29. Strange or unpleasant body odors
30. Increased perspiration
31. Poor circulation, tingling sensation in limbs and extremities
32. Sensitive and/or bleeding gums
33. Gingivitis
34. ?Burning Mouth Syndrome? or the sensation of one?s tongue, or mouth burning as well as strange taste in the mouth
35. Osteoporosis
36. Tinnitus (ie. Ringing or strange noises in the ears)
37. Lethargy

Not all women will experience everything on this list or may go through a combination of several. The secret to getting through menopause is to remember that each symptom is normal and will eventually pass.

Kathryn Whittaker has an interest in Menopause topics. For further information on Menopause please visit http://www.natural-menopause-relief-secrets.com/menopause.html or http://natural-menopause-relief-secrets.com/blog/2006/08/11/the-symptoms-of-menopause/

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Weight Loss During Menopause IS Possible!


Menopause: an unloved but unavoidable time period in every woman's life, during which hormones act up and many unwanted symptoms show up. One of the hardest to deal with is weight gain.

There are a number of different issues that can contribute to weight gain during the pre- and post-menopause time frames. It is important to understand this, as it is easier to combat several smaller issues than to fight one big issue. As you deal with each issue, you will eventually destroy the overall problem: menopausal weight gain. Let's look at some of these issues:

An inactive lifestyle - Our culture contributes to this daily. Most of us spend the day sitting down at our jobs, and when we are at home we have many time-saving devices which, unfortunately, also save us from having to move around and get exercise. This lifestyle, combined with menopause, causes weight gain to accelerate. This can be combated by making some small changes in your habits. Walk or bike to work or in the evening. Join a fitness club or class. Get a pass to the local pool. Even going up and down stairs instead of taking the elevator helps to get your heart rate up and burn off calories.

A slowing metabolism - Unfortunately, with age comes a slower metabolism. While it is easy to write this off as a hopeless issue, since we all age, it is one that can still be fought by adding exercise into daily routines.

Inherited weight problems - If people you are related to struggle with their weight, take this as a warning sign: you are probably prone to weight problems as well. Just knowing this can help you to prevent weight gain, as you can be on the lookout for any signs of obesity and be ready to make changes in your lifestyle or eating habits to counter it.

Thyroid troubles - As you approach menopause, please take the time to visit your doctor and have your thyroid tested. Often, people are not aware that their thyroid is not working properly, and just attribute their weight gain to menopause. Medication is available to help get the thyroid working properly again.

Don't be overwhelmed by these changes, and don't be afraid of what menopause will bring. Be informed and be ready to combat unwanted symptoms. If you do, you will be making yourself healthy and your life more enjoyable.

Learn more about weight loss during menopause at http://menopause.factsandnews.com/

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Wednesday, November 28, 2007

List Of Common Menopause Symptoms

Below is a partial list of Menopause Symptoms. As you read through the list I think it will help you to see that these are some of the normal changes you may experience when you're entering the menopause arena! Even though these symptoms can be scary, it can be a comfort to know that you aren't experiencing these menopause symptoms alone! There are thousands and thousands of women just like you and me who face these issues every day. Together we can conquer menopause. Lets take a quick look.

- Irritability - Hot flashes, night sweats, cold flash or clammy feeling - Heartbeat irregularities - Mood swings - Can't get a good nights sleep - Irregular periods; heavy to very light periods, longer or shorter cycles - Loss of sexual interest - Vagina dryness, can be painful during sexual intercourse - Extreme fatigue - Feelings of anxiety and/or depression - Memory lapses - Tenderness in your breasts - Weight gain, especially in the waist and thigh area - Disorientation, difficulty in concentration, mental confusion - Sudden onset of bloating - Losing your balance, light-headed, dizziness - Changes in your body odor - Itchy skin, a creepy crawly feeling - Increased muscle tension - Increase of facial hair

When your hormone levels change you can experience a wide variety of symptoms. Some symptoms will last for a short period of time while others can last for years. While some women just breeze through menopause with little or no symptoms, some of us suffer severely with the menopause symptoms.

What can we do to help ourselves?

Try to keep a diary of your changes. This will help you figure out what is going on with your body. You will start to see a pattern that will help you figure out your transition point into menopause. Keep track of any type of treatments you've tried as well. This will help you gain insight into helping you manage your menopause symptoms in the future.

Every woman will have her own unique experience during the transition into menopause. Just because you have a severe symptom today does not mean its going to last forever.

Remember, there are many ways you can take control of your menopause symptoms. You CAN Conquer Menopause!

A final thought... Don't look at the changes as 'negative' ones. Having a positive mental attitude will go a long way in helping you cope with menopause symptoms.

Carlie Edwards publishes articles & resources on Today's Issues & Topics. For info on Menopause Relief visit Menopause Relief For a variety of topics & issues visit Natural Beauty Tips

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Sunday, November 25, 2007

The Symptoms Menopause Changes Estrogen And Progesterone Levels

The symptoms of menopause are caused by changes in estrogen and progesterone levels. When estrogen drops suddenly, as is seen when the ovaries are removed surgically (called surgical menopause), symptoms can be more severe. Perimenopause begins several years before menopause, when the ovaries gradually produce less estrogen. Currently, hormone replacement therapy (estrogen with or without progestin) is the primary treatment for the symptoms and long-term risks associated with menopause. The work is the latest salvo in a years-long back and forth about memory, menopause, and estrogen. During menopause, the ovaries produce less estrogen than during the reproductive years. As a result, many problems women have with menopause relate to low estrogen levels.

Perimenopause is the span of time prior to menopause when the ovaries' production of estrogen begins to slow down. Women experiencing peri- and postmenopause have found that supplemental estrogen provides the hormones they need to produce and maintain physical and emotional well being. During postmenopause, the depleted level of estrogen can increase other health-related risks such as heart disease and osteoporosis. The lower amounts of estrogen that come with menopause will cause changes in your body. Other Therapies Women also can take selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) to help prevent some of the bone problems that can occur during menopause. Generally in the past when a woman advanced into menopause, a doctor would routinely prescribe estrogen or progesterone in various strengths. During menopause, it is believed that when estrogen levels drop, this decreases the amount of serotonin available to the brain. Many physicians recommend estrogen replacement therapy to: Reduce the undesirable symptoms of menopause.

At this stage, many women experience menopause symptoms (see below). Middle-aged herself, Northrup writes from experience and, more important, from her professional expertise as a physician who has treated many women and researched menopause. A population based survey of women's experience of the menopause. You may begin to experience signs and symptoms of menopause well before your periods stop permanently. Prior to the onset of menopause, a woman can experience major changes in her moods and attitude. Prognosis Although menopause is a difficult period for some, most women will experience menopause without long-term problems. Women in perimenopause transition typically experience abnormal vaginal bleeding such as erratic periods or abnormal bleeding patterns. Women who smoke experience the menopause at an earlier age than non-smokers. However, many women experience major life changes during their middle age including menopause and sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of developing depression. In the past, menopause was shrouded in mystery and often viewed as a negative experience and a precursor to death. Most women experience menopause between the ages of about but some go through it years earlier or later, as well. "But some fortysomething women are beginning to experience menopause and many find their desire for sex declines," Gupta informed us. Some experience menopause problems that their friends never do. In the western world about 12% of woman don't experience symptoms of menopause and about 14% experience intense physical or emotional problems.

Women and physicians have questions and concerns about the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during and after menopause. Like Sheehy, she reassured women that menopause encourages a journey inwards towards wisdom and serenity.%u201D Menopausally-provoked spiritual insight continues to strike publishing gold. Several generations ago, few women lived beyond menopause. In some women the early menopause occurs spontaneously. The same may be true of women approaching menopause, many of whom live a life filled with stress and worry. Malnourished women begin menopause about 4 years earlier than well-nourished womenEarly onset of menstruation. Each week nearly 30,000 women of all ages and stages find their spirits lifted by the show's light-hearted look at menopause. While some women choose to live with their symptoms, there are many therapies for the conditions associated with menopause. Today, women can expect to live one third of their lives after menopause.

Pueraria Mirifica capsule Pueragold THAI FDA. G. 10/2003 (E)

Pueragold is a premuim grade Thai herbal product derived mainly from the White Kwao Krua (Pueraria Mirifica) which contains. Phytoestrogen (Natural Plant Estrogen). This all-natural herbal formula stimulates and rebalances older women and men hormones level.

Pueraria Mirifica CAPSULE Pueragold THAI FDA. G. 10/2003 (E)

ALL Natural Dietary Supplement

High Phytoestrogens (especially isoflavones):

*Reduces Menopausal/Post-Menopausal symptoms

*Increases sensitivity and vitality

*Enhances physical and mental ability

*Darken white hair & increases hair growth

*Alleviates sleep disorder & improves eyesight

*Enhances Breast and Skin Appearance

*Supports Healthy Prostate Function

*Supports Healthy Bone Structure

Ingredients: Pueraria Mirifica and other herbs

Packaging: 60 capsules per box

Recommended Dosage:

Men/Post-Menopausal Women: Take 1 capsule after breakfast and dinner everyday

Precautions: *If should not be used in pregnant women,nursing cervix mothers, or women diagnosed with tumors in estrogen-sensitive organs, e.g., ovary, uterus and breast. http://www.phuketherb.com/phytoestrogen-natural-plant-estrogen.html

Wirat Muenpan is the webmaster of Menopause's Secret Menopause Natural Plant Estrogen Rebalances Women Men Hormones Level To Free BREAST SPRAY $ 40 at http://www.phuketherb.com online since 2001

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Friday, November 23, 2007

Menopause's Secret Phytoestrogen Natural Plant Estrogen Rebalances Women Men Hormones Level

Populations consuming a diet high in soybean phytoestrogens (that mimic human estrogen) have lower incidences of several diseases, including breast and prostate cancer. Human estrogens and phytoestrogens There are not one but three different kinds of estrogen made by the human body: estradiol, estrone, and estriol. In fact, it is possible that taking phytoestrogen supplements may carry the same long-term risk of cancer as estrogen alone (see estrogen replacement therapy). To avoid some of the known risks of estrogen, some women take phytoestrogens, or plant-based estrogens. [2] phytoestrogen estrogen (anti-estrogen). phytoestrogen estrogen trong Soy contains high levels of isoflavones, which are weak forms of plant estrogen (also called phytoestrogen). Here's one theory: Once digested, the soybean's phytoestrogens mimic the activity of a woman's natural estrogen hormones. Critics feared that soy phytoestrogens could increase a woman's total estrogen level. But also, phytoestrogens can be helpful if your estrogen levels are high... Populations consuming a diet high in soybean phytoestrogens (compounds that mimic estrogen) have lower incidences of several diseases, including breast and prostate cancer. When estrogen levels are low (as in menopause) empty estrogen receptor sites can be filled with phytoestrogens that can exert a weak pro-estrogenic effect.

Identifying the phytoestrogenic activity of soybean isoflavones would benefit the nutritional health of the population in general, particularly women. The implication is that exposure to pathogen attack or other plant stresses may influence potential phytoestrogenic compounds in soybean in the field. sojae, which induce phytoestrogen levels in soybean cotyledons (seeds) several fold over non-induced cotyledons. Individual soybean phytoestrogens can effect a number of physiological events in mammals. Soy sauce contains very little phytoestrogen content, and many processed foods made from soybean concentrates have insignificant levels of phytoestrogens. An overall reduction in phytoestrogen levels of 12-14 percent was observed in the genetically altered soybean strains. Techniques are being determined by ARS scientists to manipulate phytoestrogen levels in soybean seed and soy-based products to maximize health benefits by their consumption. Soybean meal is an ingredient common to standard natural ingredient diets which contains a class of phytoestrogens called isoflavones. To provide growers with value added specialty varieties with phytoestrogen profiles of commercial value to major soybean utilizers. To provide growers with soybean varieties with high and consistent phytoestrogen content. To identify molecular markers in the existing maps of the soybean genome linked to genes controlling phytoestrogen content.

The present study tests the hypothesis that administration of a phytoestrogen-rich diet enhances motor and cognitive performance in young and aged mice. "These results show that women who are at risk for osteoporosis may directly benefit from eating a phytoestrogen-rich diet. For women who still get hot flashes in spite of a high phytoestrogen diet and/or use of phytoestrogen supplements, stronger therapy might be necessary. For many women, a safe and natural phytoestrogen supplement or high-phytoestrogen diet will do the trick. A Western diet contains amounts of phytoestrogens too low to allow their levels in plasma to become high enough for biological activity. Reducing the amount of phytoestrogen foods in one's diet may be helpful. There are plenty of ways to add phytoestrogens to your diet. But loading up on supplemental phytoestrogens won't undo the effects of a poor diet, he cautions. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of low levels of intake of phytoestrogens in Western habitual diet on vascular function. Short-term effects of phytoestrogen-rich diet on postmenopausal women. Restoring phytoestrogen intake http://www.phuketherb.com/phytoestrogen-natural-plant-estrogen.html

Wirat Muenpan is the webmaster of Menopause's Secret Phytoestrogen Natural Plant Estrogen Rebalances Women Men Hormones Level To Free BREAST SPRAY $ 40 at http://www.phuketherb.com online since 2001

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Menopause Treatment

Menopause is a normal part of a woman's life, and as such requires no treatment. However, the symptoms a menopausal woman suffers may range from mild to debilitating. These symptoms may require some form of treatment.

Up until recently, hormone replacement therapy, in particular estrogen replacement therapy, was the cornerstone of menopause treatment. Estrogen reduces symptoms such as hot flashes, helps maintain bone strength to delay the onset of osteoporosis, and can reduce urinary incontinence. Sufficient estrogen levels in the body are also needed to keep cholesterol levels lower. However, despite these beneficial effects, recent research has shown that long-term hormone replacement therapy may actually be harmful, increasing the chance of serious complications such as heart attacks, strokes, certain types of breast cancer, dementia and gallstones.

Revised US Food and Drug Administration guidelines recommend that most women receive only short-term hormone replacement therapy. This short-term therapy is usually beneficial in reducing symptoms, without the attendant health risks long-term therapy poses. Only women who are considered to be at high risk for osteoporosis, a disease in which the bones become progressively weaker, may benefit from long-term hormone replacement therapy. Before starting any hormone replacement therapy, a woman should have a breast examination, and if thought necessary by her physician, a mammogram to rule out breast cancer.

Women with osteoporosis may be prescribed drugs such as biphosphonates to reduce bone loss. There are also a number of lifestyle changes a woman can make that may greatly improve her symptoms. These include stopping smoking, controlling alcohol intake, getting regular exercise, and eating a healthy diet, which become especially important as a woman gets older. These changes help maintain weight and reduce the risk of heart disease. Soy products are rich in plant estrogens, and are reported to reduce the intensity of hot flashes. Menopausal women have tried various forms of meditation with varying levels of success.

Although hormone replacement therapy is effective against distressing symptoms of menopause, recent research shows that it has serious side-effects. Therefore, alternative menopausal therapies are being developed, including new drugs to fight osteoporosis, changes in diet and lifestyle, and meditation.

Menopause provides detailed information on menopause, early menopause, male menopause, menopause and osteoporosis and more. Menopause is affliated with Endometriorsis And Infertility

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Tuesday, November 20, 2007

Menopause Weight Gain


Weight gain in menopausal women, particularly in the abdominal area, is associated with decreased levels of the hormone estrogen. Fat accumulates around the stomach area, not around the hips and thighs as it does at a younger age. The exact mechanism of this weight gain is not fully understood. Also, with increasing age, there is more conversion of muscle tissue into fat and a tendency to gain weight. Women going through menopause may become less physically active, or change eating habits. Metabolism also slows down with increasing age. All these factors contribute to cause weight gain in women soon after menopause. Contrary to popular belief, hormone replacement therapy has not been shown to cause weight gain; it may actually have a protective effect.

Weight gain in the abdominal area should be kept in check, as it is associated with an increased chance of developing heart disease. This is accentuated by higher cholesterol levels in post-menopausal women. Weight gain may also lead to reduced physical activity, which in turn can result in further loss of muscle mass and weakening of the bones. Other conditions associated with weight gain are high blood pressure and diabetes. It is therefore important to prevent excess weight gain after menopause.

Steps women can take to limit weight gain are moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes each day and eating low-fat and high-fiber foods such as fruit and vegetables. It is important to avoid crash and fad diets as such diets result in more muscle loss and slow down the body's metabolism. Foods rich in fats, such as chocolate and fast food, should be sparingly consumed or avoided. Regular contact with a physician, dietician or other health care provider can improve chances of successful weight maintenance or weight loss.

Menopause provides detailed information on menopause, early menopause, male menopause, menopause and osteoporosis and more. Menopause is affliated with Endometriorsis And Infertility.

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Monday, November 19, 2007

The Yoga of Menopause

 

It?s big news when a favored medical treatment ? HRT for menopausal women ? is found to be harmful. But it?s no news to readers of Susun Weed. She?s been blowing the whistle on both scientific and alternative treatments of menopause for nearly two decades. Read on to find out more!

Susun maintains: ?Menopause is not a ?pathology?, but a passage to power. Like puberty, menopause is a natural ? and healthy ? change. Wise women the world over herald menopause as a health-promoting event. They see hot flashes as ?power surges? and menopause as an intense spiritual journey. Most treatments ? including ERT, HRT, isoflavone, and progesterone creams ? disrupt this process and can do severe damage to a woman?s health.?

MENOPAUSE IS ENLIGHTENMENT

The energy aspects of menopause are of special interest to me.

As a long-time student of yoga, I was struck by the many similarities between menopausal symptoms and the well-known esoteric goal of "awakening of the kundalini." Though the ideas presented in this section may seem strange or difficult to comprehend, they contain powerful messages about menopause, which lie at the heart of the Wise Woman approach.

Kundalini [is] the root [of] all spiritual experiences ... Kundalini is a special kind of energy known in many cultures, including Tibetan, Indian, Sumerian, Chinese, Irish, Aztec, and Greek. Kundalini is said to be hot, fast, powerful, and large. It exists within the earth, within all life, and within each person. Psychoanalyst Carl G. Jung called kundalini anima. Kundalini is usually represented as a serpent coiled at the base of the spine, but women's mystery stories locate it in the uterus - or the area where the uterus was, if a hysterectomy has occurred. During both puberty and menopause, a woman's kundalini is difficult to control and may cause a great number of symptoms.

East Indian yogis spend lifetimes learning to activate, or wake up, their kundalini. This is also called "achieving enlightenment". When they succeed, a surge of super-heated energy goes up the spine, throughout the nerves, dilating blood vessels, and fueling itself with hormones. As kundalini continues to travel up the spine, it changes the functioning of the endocrine, cardiovascular, and nervous systems. Not just in yogis, but in any woman who allows herself to become aware of it. Menopause is a kind of enlightenment. Hot flashes are kundalini training sessions.

TAKING HORMONES? THESE HERBS ARE FOR YOU

More and more American women are using herbal remedies to help them with menopausal problems. Those who do take ERT (estrogen replacement) or HRT (hormone replacement) may be surprised to discover that herbal medicine has a lot to offer them as well.

Herbs for women on ERT/HRT include those that alleviate side-effects as well as those that counter problems caused by the hormones.

Herbal Helpers Counter Side-Effects

Water retention is the symptom most often cited for dissatisfaction with hormone replacement. Herbal tinctures and tea, such as dandelion or cleavers, and ordinary foods can not only relieve the distress, they will go to the root of the problem and help prevent recurrences.

Dandelion root tincture (Taraxacum officinale) strengthens the liver and helps it process out the excess hormones you are taking. When the liver works well, the kidneys work better, and tissues no longer bloat. A dose is 10-20 drops in several ounces of water or juice 2-3 three times a day. If you have any digestion problems, take your dandelion before meals; otherwise, anytime is fine. You can safely take dandelion daily for months or years if you need or want to.

Cleavers herb tincture (Galium molluga) tells the lymphatic tissues to get moving. Relief from edema is usually rapid when 20-30 drops are taken in several ounces of water or juice. Repeat up to six times at hourly intervals if needed. Cleavers is especially helpful for easing swollen, sore breasts.

Foods that relieve water retention include (in order of effectiveness): asparagus, nettles, corn (and corn silk tea), grapes, cucumbers, watermelon (and watermelon seed tea), parsley, celery, black tea, and green tea.

Headaches are the second most common side-effect of hormone use. Unfortunately, they are common among menopausal women not taking hormones, too. Herbs that help relieve headache without a drug-like action - such as dandelion, yellow dock, milk thistle, burdock, garden sage, skullcap, and St. John's/Joan's wort - are generally considered safe to take with hormones.

Chinese herbalists say headaches are caused by liver stress. My favorite liver-strengthening herbs are dandelion, yellow dock, milk thistle seed, and burdock. I use one at a time, a 15-25 drops of the tincture several times a day, for two weeks. If symptoms continue, I switch to a different herb.

A strong tea of garden sage leaves (Salvia officinalis) offers immediate relief from headaches and helps prevent future ones. It also reduces night sweats. Tinctures of skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora) and St. Joan's/John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) ease pain and relieve muscle spasms. Use 5-20 drops of skullcap and a dropperful of St.J's at the very first sign - no, the very first thought - of a headache. Repeat the doses every five minutes until pain free. Skullcap can be quite sedative, especially in large doses.

Herbal Allies to Prevent Problems Caused by Taking Hormones

Breast cancer risk is increased 20% in women who use ERT for five or more years. Use of HRT for five or more years increases breast cancer risk by 40%. Each five years of continued use increases the risk. In addition, women who take ERT are far more likely to get uterine or endometrial cancers. All women on hormones increase their risks of lung and ovarian cancer, too. Nourishing herbs such as red clover, and foods such as beans and yogurt, offer easy ways to stay cancer-free.

Red clover blossoms (Trifolium pratense), when dried and brewed into a strong infusion (one ounce herb steeped an a quart of boiling water for at least four hours) prevent cancer by providing phytoestrogens that counter the cancer-promoting effects of oral hormones. Usual dose is 2-4 cups a day. The infusion tastes like black tea and can be flavored with mint if you like.

Since uncooked beans and unfermented soy contain anti-nutritional factors that may promote bone loss and dementia, soy "milk" and tofu are not recommended. Miso and tamari definitely help to prevent breast cancer but soy isoflavones may promote it.

Yogurt helps build powerful immunity. Women who eat a quart of yogurt a week have 700% less cancer than women who eat no yogurt.

Dry eyes afflict more than 9% of women using ERT and over 7% of those on HRT. Risk increases by 70% for every year of continued use. And the longer a woman uses hormones, the greater her risk. Herbs such as oatstraw, chamomile, and chickweed can help relieve and prevent this problem.

Oatstraw infusion (Avena sativa) cools and moistens your eyes from the inside out, builds strong bones too. Use one ounce of dried herb in a quart jar; fill to the top with boiling water and cap tightly. Let steep four or more hours. Dose is 2-4 cups a day. Refrigerate after straining.

Cucumber slices ease dry eyes; so do chamomile tea bags.

The ultimate ally for women with dry eyes is fresh chickweed (Stellaria media), applied as a poultice to the closed eyes. Leave on for five minutes, or until the plant material feels warm (it will heat up). Repeat as needed.

Stroke and heart attack are actually increased by use of ERT/HRT, though modern medicine has long proclaimed the opposite. Every major double-blind study done to date has created a larger and larger gap between ERT/HRT's supposed ability to help cardiovascular health and its actual results. Protect your heart with nourishing and tonifying herbs and foods such as motherwort, hawthorn, and cherries.

Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca) tincture helps the heart. The Japanese claim it is their secret of longevity. A dose is 5-15 drops, twice a day. Motherwort also relieves hot flashes, calms tachycardiia, and eases anxiety. It's an all-in-one remedy for menopausal women.

Hawthorn (Crataegus oxycantha) flowers, leaves, and fruits are all used to maintain heart health and control fluid build-up in heart tissues. A dose is 20- 30 drops of tincture 2-4 times a day, or a cup of tea with meals. This widespread shrub is considered one of the finest heart tonics in the world.

Cherries are even better than apples at keeping the doctor away. Dried cherries and cherry juice, even tincture of cherries.

More than three-quarters of the women in America over the age of fifty have refused ERT/HRT. If you want to join them, taper off your dosage slowly, while continuing to use nourishing and tonifying herbs such as dandelion, motherwort, red clover, oatstraw, and seaweed.

THERE ARE MANY TYPES OF ESTROGENS

  • Women make estrogens.
  • Plants make estrogens and estrogen-like compounds.
  • Chemicals, especially organochlorines, act like estrogens (xenoestrogens).

Pharmaceutical companies make estrogens from substances such as horse urine, wild yam roots, and petrochemicals. Tamoxifen, used to treat and prevent breast cancer, is a type of pharmaceutical estrogen.

Women make at least thirty types of estrogen, including estradiol, estrone, and estrace. Estradiol is the strongest; it is turned on at puberty and turned off at menopause. Estradiol is positively linked with breast cancer; other human estrogens are not. Anything that reduces the amount of estradiol a woman produces (such as pregnancy, lactation, early menopause, and late puberty) also decreases her risk of a breast cancer diagnosis.

Phytoestrogens counter the detrimental effects of estradiol by competing for the same receptor sites.

Estradiol is a strong estrogen and is metabolized by the long path. The other estrogens our bodies make are weak estrogens and are metabolized by the short path. Alcohol turns off the short path. Phytoestrogens are weak hormones and hormonal precursors. Phytoestrogens in foods are metabolized by the short path. Phytoestrogens appear to protect tissues from the cancer-causing effects of estradiol, xenoestrogens and pharmaceutical hormones. Phytoestrogens in foods prevent cancer and promote health; phytoestrogen supplements and processed soy fake-foods may do the opposite. Breast cancer occurs four times more often in women whose urinary output of phytoestrogen by-products is low compared to women whose urinary output is high.

Phytoestrogens are common in food. They are concentrated in seeds (grains, beans, nuts, berries) and roots. The exceptions to the rule that plants don't contain human hormones: French beans, rice, apple seeds, licorice, and pomegranate seeds contain the "weak" estrogen estrone.

To get the greatest benefit from phytoestrogenic foods and herbs remember:

  1. Isolated phytoestrogens are not as safe as those "in matrix."
  2. To make use of plant hormones, you need active, healthy gut flora.
  3. Herbs and foods rich in phytoestrogens need to be used in different ways.
  4. Phytoestrogens may have different effects on women who do not have their ovaries.

  1. Plants contain many types of phytoestrogens; additionally, they contain minerals and other constituents which help our bodies modify the phytoestrogens and so we can use them safely. Red clover is mineral-rich and contains all four of the major types of phytoestrogens: lignans, coumestans, isoflavones, and resorcylic acid lactones. It is the world's best-known anti-cancer herb. In general, foods and herbs rich in phytoestrogens, with the possible exception of licorice, show anti-cancer abilities. Isoflavone, however, when isolated (usually from soy) has the opposite effect: in the lab it encourages the growth of breast cancer cells (endnote 32 in New Menopausal Years).

  2. Plant hormones, including most phytoestrogens, can't be used by humans. But we can convert them into ones we can use - with the help of our gut bacteria. When women take antibiotics, their excretion of phytoestrogens plummets. Get your gut flora going by eating more yogurt, miso, unpasteurized sauerkraut, homemade beers and wines, picked-by-your-own-hands-and-unwashed fruits and salads, sourdough bread, and whey-fermented vegetables. (See Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon for whey-fermented vegetable recipes.)

  3. Plants which are exceptionally rich in phytoestrogens are regarded as powerful herbal medicines. Plants which are good sources of phytoestrogens are regarded as foods. While food can certainly be our medicine - a practice I advocate - it is also true that medicines are more dangerous than foods. Foods rich in phytoestrogens are different than medicinal herbs rich in phytoestrogens. They have different places in my life.

    • I eat phytoestrogenic foods daily in quantity.
    • I use phytoestrogenic food-like herbs regularly (not daily), in moderate quantity.
    • I take phytoestrogenic herbs rarely, in small amounts, for a limited time.

    Phytoestrogenic foods are the basis for a healthy diet and a long life. The first food listed is the highest in phytoestrogens. The best diet contains not just one but many choices from each list:

    • Whole grains (rye, oats, barley, millet, rice, wheat, corn)
    • Edible seeds (buckwheat, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin, amaranth, quinoa)
    • Beans (yellow split peas, black turtle beans, baby limas, Anasazi beans, red kidney beans, red lentils, soy beans)
    • Leafy greens and seaweed (parsley, nettle, kelp, cabbage, broccoli, kale, collards, lamb's quarter)
    • Fruits (olives, cherries, grapes, apples, pears, peaches, plums, strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, salmon berries, apricots, crab apples, quinces, rosehips, blueberries)
    • Olive oil and seed oils. Garlic, onions and their relatives leeks, chives, scallions, ramps, shallot

    Phytoestrogenic food-like herbs are generally considered longevity tonics. For optimum effect, use only one from the list below and to stick with it for at least three months.

    • Citrus peel, dandelion leaves and/or roots, fenugreek seeds, flax seeds, green tea, hops, red clover, red wine.

    Phytoestrogenic herbs are usually too powerful for long- term use. From the list below (which is in alphabetical order), it is safest to use only one herb at a time, and use it only when needed, although that may mean daily use for several months. More information about these herbs, including specific dosages and cautions, is in New Menopausal Years the Wise Woman Way.

    • Agave root, black cohosh root, black currant, black haw, chasteberries, cramp bark, dong quai root, devil's club root, false unicorn root, ginseng root, groundsel herb, licorice, liferoot herb, motherwort herb, peony root, raspberry leaves, rose family plants (most parts), sage leaves, sarsaparilla root, saw palmetto berried, wild yam root, yarrow blossoms.

  4. Most of the warnings about phytoestrogenic herbs center on their proven ability to thicken the uterine wall in animals who have had their ovaries removed. This could encourage cancer, just as taking ERT encourages cancer of the uterus by stimulating cell growth. Women without ovaries are probably safe eating phytoestrogenic foods, but may want to use phytoestrogenic herbs - especially ginseng, dong quai, licorice, red clover, and wild yam - in small amounts and only for short periods.

FURTHER NOTES ON PHYTOESTROGENIC PLANTS

  • Recent studies indicate black cohosh does not suppress luteinizing hormone, has no estrogenic effect, and contains no compounds related to estrogen. Red clover flower heads contain many hormone-like flavonoids, including isoflavone, daidzein, genistein, formononetin, biochanin, sitosterol, and coumestrol, a particularly strong phytoestrogen (six times more active than the one in soy). Red clover contains all four major estrogenic isoflavones; soy has only two of them. A cup of red clover infusion (not tea) contains ten times more phytoestrogens than a cup of soy beverage, is richer in calcium, has less calories, and contains no added sugars.

  • Researchers in Australia report a million lambs a year are aborted after sheep eat clover on pasture. Yet red clover is renowned as a fertility enhancer. What's up? Stephen Buhner, author of The Secret Language of Plants, says clover plants make blood-thinning compounds (which cause abortion) when overgrazed, but don't otherwise. Plants, it turns out, can fight back.

  • When unfermented soy takes the place of animal protein (meat and milk), its anti-nutritional factors can create brittle bones, thyroid problems, memory loss, vision impairment, irregular heartbeat, depression, and vulnerability to infections. Unfermented soy is high in hemoglutin, which causes clumping of red blood cells and may increase risk of stroke. It is also impressively rich in aluminum (up to 100 times more than is found in the same amount of real milk). Eating tofu more than once a week doubled the risk of Alzheimer's in a small group of Japanese men studied for thirty years.

  • Human gut bacteria can cleave a sugar molecule from wild yam's steroidal saponin, producing diosgenin. Labs make progesterone from diosgenin, but our bodies can't. Diosgenin itself has a weak estrogenic effect. According to Australian herbalist Ruth Trickey: "A more probable explanation [for the observed effects of wild yam] ... is that [diosgenin] interacts with hypothalamic and pituitary hormones and ... initiates ovulation."

Susun Weed
PO Box 64
Woodstock, NY 12498
Fax: 1-845-246-8081

Visit Susun Weed at: www.susunweed.com;and www.ashtreepublishing.com

For permission to reprint this articleFree Web Content, contact us at: susunweed@herbshealing.com


Vibrant, passionate, and involved, Susun Weed has garnered an international reputation for her groundbreaking lectures, teachings, and writings on health and nutrition. She challenges conventional medical approaches with humor, insight, and her vast encyclopedic knowledge of herbal medicine. Unabashedly pro-woman, her animated and enthusiastic lectures are engaging and often profoundly provocative.

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Menopause, Soy Food and Hormone Balance


In an 8 year study, Freeman's group tracked 231 women who were about to enter menopause, none of whom had any history of depression up to the time they enrolled. The Center for Epidemiological Studies of Depression (CED-D) scale was used to assess depressive symptoms during followup. The probability of a high CES-D score (at least 16) was four-fold greater during the menopausal transition than during the premenopausal phase, the report indicates. Similarly, entering menopause was tied to a more than doubled risk of being diagnosed with a depressive disorder.


Soy foods contain several ingredients that may be useful in preventing disease during the time where women lack the protective hormones. Isoflavonoids, such as genistein and daidzein are weak estrogens and may lessen the risk of osteoporosis and heart disease. Protease inhibitors in soy foods may reduce the risk of cancer.
Many women notice early symptoms while still having periods, when the hormone production is declining very gradually. This stage of gradually falling and fluctuating hormone levels is often called the 'climacteric' or the 'change' and often begins in the 4th decade and can last for several years. Because ovarian function fluctuates, women may experience menopause symptoms intermittently. Some women experience an early, or premature menopause following which, symptoms may occur immediately, depending on the cause. Immediate onset of menopause symptoms often follows a surgical menopause. The duration of 'early' symptoms is very variable from a few months to many years and the severity varies between individuals. (see Balance Hormone)


A study at Bowman Gray Medical School showed twenty grams of soy a day decreased hot flashes. Compared to a placebo (sugar pill) group it also lowered both blood pressure and cholesterol. A study at the University of Illinois showed a significant increase in bone density after six months of a high soy diet.


Hormones can affect many vital functions in your body. That's why keeping your hormones in their proper balance is essential to the way you live. Find out about Balance Hormone at http://www.smartreviewguide.com/balancehormone

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Sunday, November 18, 2007

Menopause.... Discover How To Control The Symptoms.

 

While menopause is a normal change in life that all women experience, the symptoms can be extremely bothersome. Some women are bombarded with these uncomfortable symptoms, and search out ways to help control them. Here we will discuss menopause and how to help control its symptoms.

Hot flashes are one of the most common symptoms of menopause. Hot flashes are also known as night sweats, but do not always occur at night. It is when your body becomes suddenly hot, so hot, that it radiates into the face and neck area. Very often the person suffering with the hot flash will sweat so profusely that the sweat will saturate her clothing. A hot flash is usually always followed by a chill, or cooling down period. To help control hot flashes effectively, a woman can add soy products or more fiber to her diet.

Vaginal dryness is another uncomfortable symptom of menopause. Research studies have shown that adding vitamin E supplements to their daily routines, many women have lessened, and even eliminated vaginal dryness all together. Vitamin E suppositories are available for menopausal women - these are inserted into the vagina. Vitamin E is also proven effective in aiding in the reduction, or even elimination, of hot flashes, as well.

There are numerous natural remedies to help in controlling many of the symptoms of menopause. Due to lack of hormones being produced in their bodies, many women will experience bouts of moodiness, and sometimes even depression. St. John's Wart, which can be purchased at many health food stores, can often help with this. By adding a St. John's Wart supplement to their daily routine, many women have reported being less irritable, less depressed, and even energized. Other supplements that can help with moodiness include kava kava and valerian.

Black cohosh is a very popular herb women use to help cut down on the symptoms of menopause. Black cohosh can help with hot flashes, cramps, and heavy menstrual bleeding. Research studies have also shown that black cohosh may even help prevent osteoporosis. Most research studies recommend you take black cohosh extract, and it may take two to four weeks before noticed results occur.

Like black cohosh, chasterberry (or vitex agnus castus) can help alleviate symptoms of menopause including hot flashes and vaginal dryness. In addition to these symptoms of menopause, chasterberry may also help with breast tenderness. Women have reported it taking up to four weeks to achieve noticeable results.

While the symptoms of menopause can be uncomfortable, bothersome, and irritating, there is hope. In addition to traditional hormone replacement therapy, many options are available to help lessen, or even eliminate the symptoms of menopause.

The author Linda Johns had the experience of breastfeeding her own children and is the wife of Allan Johns who has over twenty years experience in health and related industries and now devotes his time to sharing his knowledge with the millions of people interested in improving or learning more about better health. Don't miss Allan's information packed health site at: http://www.betterhealthcentre.com/

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Thursday, November 15, 2007

Menopause and Vaginal Dryness


Many women feel vaginal dryness during menopause due to the thinning of the mucus membranes and the loss of elasticity in the walls of the vagina. The reduction in the production of estrogen in the ovaries may cause the thinning of the vaginal lining. This, in itself, does not cause any problems, unless the lining of the vagina becomes inflamed and dry; then it is painful.

Vaginal dryness is medically known as 'atrophic vaginitis,' and it sounds like a disease, though it is not. It can be overcome with simple remedies, such as, a good nutritional program during your menopause. This is an excellent way of preventing your vagina from becoming dry and thin. Other solutions to the problem are the estrogen replacement creams, tri-estrogen cream or triple estrogen cream, and pills that your doctor can prescribe. Certain Over- The-Counter (OTC) vaginal lubricants could be helpful too. Applying Vitamin E oil helps hydrating the vaginal membranes.

If you are on medications, such as antihistamines, decongestants or other drugs with drying potential, these can cause drying of the mucous membranes, aggravating the problem. Doctors suggest a perineal wash (area between the posterior vulva junction and the anus in females) once a day. Women need to rinse the vulvar region (the external genital organs of the female, including the labia majora, labia minora, clitoris, and entrance of the vagina) with plain water. Opening the labia gently with one hand, water is either sprayed from a squirt bottle or poured gently from a square container.

Menopause, Vaginal Dryness and Sex Though menopause is nature's contraceptive, women need to wait at least a year before giving up on contraceptives.

During Perimenopause, the period leading to menopause, the sexual desire gets diminishes often. The thinning of the genital membranes and vaginal dryness often lead to discomfort during masturbation and sexual intercourse.

Women who have infrequent intercourse could gently stretch the vaginal tissues by inserting a couple of fingers in the vagina during bath. This may prevent vaginismus, a muscular contraction causing the vagina to close, and pain on penetration. Maintaining regular sexual activity, and/or masturbation will help. To aid vaginal lubrication, which is delayed with age, women can ask their partners to prolong foreplay. This could make penetration easy and comfortable.

Treating Thinning of Membranes and Vaginal Dryness ?? Start with drinking 2 liters of water and herbal tea every day. ?? Consumption of soybean stimulates estrogen production, leading to elimination of vaginal dryness in many women. ?? Adding canola, olive, sunflower, or soybean oil to your diet will add lubrication to your body. ?? Doctors suggest applying intra-vaginally, natural progesterone cream once a day. ?? In doses of 200 IU at a time, take 600 to 800 IU of Vitamin E daily. Vitamin E is contra-indicated for hypertension, diabetes or a rheumatic heart. You will need to consult your doctor. ?? One effective way of easing vaginal dryness is to insert a Vitamin E capsule intra-vaginally.

Cathy Taylor is a marketing consultant with over 26 years experience. She specializes in internet marketing, strategy and plan development as well as management of communications nad public relations programs for small business sectors. She can be reached at Creative Communications; creative-com@cox.net or by vistiing www.everythingmenopause.com, www.everythingandropause.com or www.howtoconquermenopause.com

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Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Male "Menopause" - The Alternative Anti-Aging Approach

 

If you are a male over the age of 40 and are suffering from weakness, impotence, pain, stiffness, drooping muscles, depression, anxiety, or heat intolerance, you may be experiencing "andropause".

Andropause is a syndrome resulting from the deficiency of hormones, especially testosterone. It's onset and symptoms may not be as dramatic as female "menopause", but its effects can be just as serious. It is interesting that hormone replacement is quite routine in women but barely even addressed in men. The decline in hormone levels in both sexes has an adverse impact on one's state of health. Starting around age 25, DHEA and testosterone levels begin a progressive downward trend. With falling hormones, it is much harder to maintain muscle mass. Things begin to sag and fat begins to form increasingly thick layers around the lower back and abdomen. Stamina is affected and exercise intolerance occurs. Osteoporosis is well-documented in women and occurs in men as well. This can result in hip and vertebral compression fractures. Wrinkles that carve deep crevices in the face are partially due to testosterone deficiency. Libido is reduced and even impotence may develop. These changes are all a result of male "menopause".

Hormone replacement has been available for women for decades and the positive results continue to multiply. In Anti-Aging medicine, it is expected that maintenance of hormone levels in the youthful range (that of a 25-30 year old) will provide substantial health benefit. Proper monitoring of hormone replacement is a relatively recent innovation that makes this therapy much safer. We can now insure proper dosages in the accepted normal physiologic range. Cancer risk is greatly reduced by this refined approach to replacement therapy.

The decline in testosterone occurs as a result of multiple causes and treatment should be directed accordingly. Aromatase (an enzyme that converts Testosterone into Estradiol) increases as we gain years. This increases raises the free estrogens and lowers the free Testosterone. Prostate cancer is correlated with high circulating estrogens. Aromatase inhibitors, such as chrysin, nettle extract, and Arimidex can inhibit aromatse. Testicular atrophy leads to decreased testosterone production. A course of treatment with HCG stimulates testicular development and can boost Testosterone production. A complete vitamin, mineral, and antioxidant supplement plus a proper diet help to correct nutritional deficiencies. DHEA and possible melatonin replacement also serve as alternatives and as adjuncts to testosterone therapy. A diet that includes a large amount of legumes, especially soy, is helpful in providing the necessary building blocks for our bodies to manufacture hormones. Maintaining cholesterol in the normal range (not to high or to low) is also critical for hormone synthesis. Testosterone replacement can be accomplished by the use of creams, pills or even injection. It is best if the physiologic patterns natural to the body are mimicked, which makes injection less favorable. Creams containing natural testosterone are well absorbed through the skin, bypass metabolism by the liver, and are easy to apply, thus making them superior to pills. The potential risks of testosterone administration include increases in red cell mass, worsening of sleep apnea, changes in plasma lipid levels, and fluid retention. There is some concern that testosterone replacement might exacerbate benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). There is no change in PSA with testosterone therapy. You are not a candidate for this replacement therapy if you have an active testicular or prostate cancer. Finally, testosterone supplementation may produce adverse side effects if administered to men with normal levels, hence the importance of monitoring.

With proper replacement, you can expect to regain muscle mass, increase bone density, increase stamina, increase libido, reduce your risk for a variety of cancers and Alzheimer's disease, and live an improved quality of life.

Dr. Rod Rojas is a board certified physician and Medical Director of IHC SKIN LASER & ANTI-AGING CLINIC, member of the prestigious American Academy Of Anti-Aging Medicine.

If you are suffering any of these symptoms, give us a call at The Skin Laser and Anti-Aging Clinic 843-757-8717.

We will be very happy to assist you.

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Monday, November 12, 2007

Menopause: The Emotional & Psychological Impact


Menopause, which literally means the cessation of menses, represents the stage in a woman's life when her reproductive capacity has been brought to an end. There are many hormonal changes that lead to the cessation of menses. The main cause is the drop in oestrogen.

Hormonal Changes

It has been traditionally assumed that depression and other psychological problems are a direct cause of menopause. However, recent studies have revealed that this is not necessarily true. Researchers have discovered a rise in the incidents of depression in women ranging form 35 to 43 years old, which is a lot before menopause. In most cases, menopause occurs between 49 and 51, although some women may experience it before 40.

Most hormonal changes occur during the few years before menopause, which are referred to as the perimenopausal stage. These changes may increase the production of serotonin, a chemical in the brain connected to depression. This is why mood swings are not uncommon during this period. Another hormonal change during the perimenopausal stage is the decrease in the oestrogen level.

Psychological & Emotional Impact

Oestrogen, which is linked to depression, explains why there are higher depression rates in women than in men. However, as the oestrogen level decreases before menopause, the risk of depression should also decrease.

The increased depression rate encountered during menopause suggests that it is not actually the hormonal changes, but the psychological impact associated with this stage that causes the problems. For most women, the changes in status and fertility associated with menopause affect a wide range of other aspects, such as the way they view themselves and their sexuality.

Menopause is also associated with some changes in body tissues. Breast tissues become less firm, while the genital organs become smaller. Between 50% and 75% of women experiencing menopause have hot flushes, which consist of brief body temperature rises accompanied by sweating and skin flushing. These hot flushes can cause not only physical discomfort, but also occasional social discomfort and sleeping disorders.

Attitude

While everyone agrees that dealing with all the physical changes that occur during menopause is not easy, most psychologists feel that depression during this stage is more a matter of attitude. The changes associated with menopause can be viewed from a different angle. During this stage, women can explore their creativity and social potential and expand their contribution to society. The fact that they are now freed from the fear of pregnancy gives them the opportunity to rejuvenate their sex life. Unfortunately, most women feel that the end of their fertility is the end of their sexuality too.

Psychologists state that women who have a positive attitude on the changes that happen in their body look healthier and are likely to have an increased interest in sex. In contrast, those who believe in the myth that menopause is the end of their womanhood, the start to lose their attractiveness and vitality and look older. Other studies have proved that negative attitudes on menopause also increase the unpleasant symptoms associated with it, such as hot flashes, fatigue, night sweats, sleeping disorders and aches.


Sue Taylor is the webmaster of a site dedicated to the impact on women of undergoing menopause. Refer to http://www.menopausesite.info

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Menopause: The Emotional & Psychological Impact


Menopause, which literally means the cessation of menses, represents the stage in a woman's life when her reproductive capacity has been brought to an end. There are many hormonal changes that lead to the cessation of menses. The main cause is the drop in oestrogen.

Hormonal Changes

It has been traditionally assumed that depression and other psychological problems are a direct cause of menopause. However, recent studies have revealed that this is not necessarily true. Researchers have discovered a rise in the incidents of depression in women ranging form 35 to 43 years old, which is a lot before menopause. In most cases, menopause occurs between 49 and 51, although some women may experience it before 40.

Most hormonal changes occur during the few years before menopause, which are referred to as the perimenopausal stage. These changes may increase the production of serotonin, a chemical in the brain connected to depression. This is why mood swings are not uncommon during this period. Another hormonal change during the perimenopausal stage is the decrease in the oestrogen level.

Psychological & Emotional Impact

Oestrogen, which is linked to depression, explains why there are higher depression rates in women than in men. However, as the oestrogen level decreases before menopause, the risk of depression should also decrease.

The increased depression rate encountered during menopause suggests that it is not actually the hormonal changes, but the psychological impact associated with this stage that causes the problems. For most women, the changes in status and fertility associated with menopause affect a wide range of other aspects, such as the way they view themselves and their sexuality.

Menopause is also associated with some changes in body tissues. Breast tissues become less firm, while the genital organs become smaller. Between 50% and 75% of women experiencing menopause have hot flushes, which consist of brief body temperature rises accompanied by sweating and skin flushing. These hot flushes can cause not only physical discomfort, but also occasional social discomfort and sleeping disorders.

Attitude

While everyone agrees that dealing with all the physical changes that occur during menopause is not easy, most psychologists feel that depression during this stage is more a matter of attitude. The changes associated with menopause can be viewed from a different angle. During this stage, women can explore their creativity and social potential and expand their contribution to society. The fact that they are now freed from the fear of pregnancy gives them the opportunity to rejuvenate their sex life. Unfortunately, most women feel that the end of their fertility is the end of their sexuality too.

Psychologists state that women who have a positive attitude on the changes that happen in their body look healthier and are likely to have an increased interest in sex. In contrast, those who believe in the myth that menopause is the end of their womanhood, the start to lose their attractiveness and vitality and look older. Other studies have proved that negative attitudes on menopause also increase the unpleasant symptoms associated with it, such as hot flashes, fatigue, night sweats, sleeping disorders and aches.


Sue Taylor is the webmaster of a site dedicated to the impact on women of undergoing menopause. Refer to http://www.menopausesite.info

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Sunday, November 11, 2007

Is Menopause Driving You Crazy?


Jump Start Your Health Now... "Is Menopause Making You Crazy?"

It's A Shame For You To Suffer Through Menopause - When You Really Don't Have To"

More than 1,000 hours of painstaking research, collaboration, writing, and editing have gone into the publishing of the most reliable, informative and user-friendly book on menopause ever written... And YOU are about to benefit -- Tremendously!

What you are about to discover will change your life forever...

WARNING! No pulling the punches here... no side-stepping the issues, I'm going to tell it like it is. I'm going to DEMOLISH MYTHS and TELL YOU THE TRUTH about menopause.

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Wednesday, November 7, 2007

Peri-Menopause


Peri-Menopause

Natural midlife changes have begun when your periods become irregular. Peri-menopause refers to the time leading up to menopause when the cycle length and menstrual flow can vary significantly. You may skip a period or your flow may become heavier or lighter. A common symptom is the commencement of hot flashes, which many women describe as a sudden rush of heat that spreads over the upper part of the body and face making the skin flush and causing a sudden burst of perspiration. The onset of hot flashes can often cause embarrassment for women as they can occur at anytime without warning. Night sweats and mood swings are also common during this time and you may find that your sleep patterns change.

What is menopause?
Every woman will experience menopause and every woman will experience menopause in her own unique way. For some women, menopause will be a gradual phase that is hardly noticed. For others it can be marked with severe symptoms that make going about your daily life close to unbearable.

Menopause literally means the last monthly period of a woman''s life. However, it is confirmed when a woman has not had a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months. The gradual decrease in the ovaries production of estrogen during this time is simply the body''s natural evolution from the fertile child-bearing years to a whole new stage of life.

For most women, menopause usually occurs between the ages of 45 to 55 years.

Estrogen levels play an important role in a woman''s life. They rise at puberty with the onset of childbearing years and then increase and decrease rhythmically with your menstrual cycle. They peak during pregnancy and then decline as you reach menopause and your menstrual cycle ceases.

This decline in estrogen levels during menopause gives rise to common symptoms such as:

Hot flashes
Night sweats
Mood swings and irritability
Other symptoms associated with menopause include:

Reduced libido
Insomnia
Headaches
Urinary frequency
Dry vagina
Inability to concentrate

If you are currently going through menopause, chances are you are accustomed to more than one of these symptoms. Perhaps it''s the intense hot flash when you want it the least, or it''s the on again, off again tug of war with the blankets at night as you experience night sweats. The fact is thousands of women begin menopause everyday, so you are not alone.

Many women are also unaware that decreasing estrogen levels can have a less obvious but more harmful effect on your body, such as an increased risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) and high cholesterol.

When estrogen levels drop, the risk of osteoporosis increases. This can mean bones become more brittle and more prone to fracture. Cholesterol health may also decline in some women after menopause.

Both osteoporosis and high cholesterol levels are major long term health issues for women after menopause.

For more research articles kindly visit our website:http://www.getnutri.com/articles/default.asp


GetNutri

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How To Survive Menopause

 

Ever heard of hot flushes and mood swings? These are among the common symptoms of this medical condition commonly associated with women called menopause.

Menopause is actually a process which results to the stoppage of a woman?s monthly period. Menopause, which is characterized by hormonal changes, begins between the ages of 40 and 50.

A woman who is undergoing the process of menopause experiences lots of hormonal changes which are manifested through various symptoms like hot flushes, irritability, erratic menstrual cycle and other symptoms. Women who are in the process of getting menopause may also experience insomnia, loss of sexual urge, forgetfulness, headaches, osteoporosis and even gain in weight.

The whole cycle of menopause merely prepares a woman for that time when she stops ovulating because her ovaries have stopped producing eggs for the process of ovulation. During this process, a woman?s estrogen decreases while her progesterone is produced in minimal levels. The lack of progesterone results to a thinner uterus lining and a stoppage of the monthly menstrual cycle.

The symptoms of menopause can be quite unnerving for women particularly the changing moods and the hot flushes. However, there are ways to lessen the impact of these symptoms like estrogen replacement therapy for hot flushes. Most women however decline its use due to the risk of cyclical bleeding and getting cancer.

Menopause is not really something new because it naturally occurs in a woman?s life. However, menopause is not experienced by women alone because there is also male menopause called andropause

Women who refuse to use synthetic hormone replacement can take other options depending on the specific symptoms they are experiencing. What is important is they live a healthy lifestyle by eating the right kind of food, getting regular exercise, and refraining from bad habits like smoking and drinking.

There are menopausal women who opt for alternative or herbal medicines. However, it is safe to consult their doctors first before using these herbal medicines to make sure these are not harmful to them.

Most of the women who dread menopause are usually women who lack the basic information of what menopause is. Menopause is part of a woman?s reproductive make up and no one can avoid it. Being in this stage does not mean they can no longer live the way they used to do. There are just changes that women have to live with and confront. Instead of dreading that day when menopause sets in, women should get to know more about menopause, its symptoms and how they can live healthier and more active lives after menopause.


The author is a regular contributor to Menopause and Life where more information about menopause is freely available.

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Female Hair Loss And Menopause

Menopause is one of the most common causes of female hair loss and one of the least happily endured symptom. Female hair loss can be pretty devastating to any woman in today?s modern society, which emphasizes the importance of an attractive hairdo. Just think on the thriving multi-billion dollar in the hair care industry and the numerous advertisements on shampoo, styling products and hair loss treatments.

Like childbirth, menopause is a natural occurring state for women and ? also like childbirth ? the changes manifested in the body can be traumatic. Women begin menopause between the ages of 30 and 70, with most beginning between the mid 40s and mid 50s. However, menopause can occur unnaturally, that is, after surgery or medical treatment. In this case, the symptoms may be much more severe and female hair loss is much more likely.

Female hair loss is not a guaranteed symptom of menopause. It is less common than, for example, hot flashes and mood changes. Women experience female hair loss to varying degrees and some don't experience at all.

Exactly what causes hair loss is still not clear. But many experts have said that the most common cause is androgenetic alopecia or genetic balding. This refers to a genetic process whereby individual hair follicles metabolizes the sex hormone testosterone. Menopausal women experiencing hair loss experience a higher rate of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, or DHT. It is the effect of DHT on hair follicles that results in heair loss.

In the same respect, women who have abnormally high levels of male sex hormones can also experience thinning of scalp hair. Signs that these women display include plenty of body and facial hair, abnormal menstrual patterns and enlarged clitoris.

In addition, factors like anemia, thyroid disorders, fungal infections and stressful life situations can cause hair loss in menopausal women.

In the same way that female hair loss shows itself as a manifestation about three months after the originating cause begins, so too does female hair loss take about three months to show the effects of treatment. Estrogenic treatments like soy isoflavones or hormone replace therapies, will need to be implemented for about three months before you can determine whether or not it's working for you.

How negative a menopausal woman feels towards her hair loss differs from individual to individual. In situations where it affects her quality of life and self esteem, it is best to address the problem quickly. A proper evaluation by a professional for causes of hair loss is necessary to determine the underlying medical conditions and an appropriate course of treatment that produce the condition.

Kathelene Capelle writes on acne treatment, natural acne remedy, eczema, dry skin care and massage oils. Get skin care recipes that you can easily prepare from your kitchen! Read them all at http://www.acne-and-skin-care.com.

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Monday, November 5, 2007

Is Menopause Making Your Crazy?


Jump Start Your Health Now... "Is Menopause Making You Crazy?"

It's A Shame For You To Suffer Through Menopause - When You Really Don't Have To"

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Sunday, November 4, 2007

Diabetes and The Menopause

You might be thinking "What's the connection between diabetes and the menopause?"

Well, for ladies reaching that certain age, it can be very traumatic - especially when some of the effects experienced can easily be mistaken for those we have to be aware of when managing our diabetes...

For a diabetic taking medication, keeping blood sugars at the right level is a balancing act. If sugar levels drop too low, because of not eating enough or at the right times, you suffer a hypoglycemia episode (sometimes called 'hypo' for short). For me, this usually manifests itself as shaking; irritability; sweating and a faint-headed feeling. If you are diabetic and have ever had low-blood sugar you may recognize some of these symptoms, amongst others. A quick 'glucose fix' usually settles it within 5-10 minutes.

Now, compare that to some of the symptoms of starting the menopause; hot flushes [I call them 'power-surges' ;)] - similar to the sweats of a hypo; mood swings - akin to the irritability you might experience during a hypo. It's very easy to confuse the symptoms you are feeling.

When I first started the menopause, I frequently confused waking at 2 a.m. in the morning in a cold sweat as a hypo and took a quick sugar boost to settle myself. That pushed my blood sugar levels up when I didn't need it. Not a good idea!

It was only after visiting my Doctor to talk about these frequent, unexpected hypos I discovered I was starting the menopause (I was in my late 40s, so it was rather unexpected, normally it doesn't occur until early-to-mid 50s).

If you are a lady, with diabetes controlled by medication, and you are in your early 50s and you start having frequent, unexplained hypos - check your sugar levels before 'treating the condition'. And get your Doctor to check your symptoms. You may be confusing symptoms of diabetes and the menopause.

And guys; if your lady normally has great control of her diabetes and suddenly seems to be showing the same symptoms when she was getting her diabetes into balance (if you knew her then) please be supportive and understanding, she's going through one hell of an experience, but I promise, she will come through and be her normal, loving and charming self once again.


[? 2006 Carol Ann Bentley]

Carol Ann created http://www.your-diabetes.com to present information on diabetes from a diabetic's viewpoint

Find out more about diabetes; how to recognise it; live with it; important linked health issues. Plus, read inspiring stories from other diabetics and share your experience.

Include delicious recipes from here in your diabetic meal plan and, if you send in your favorite recipe, you could win the monthly prize draw.

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Here comes "The Change": Managing Menopause


There are a variety of symptoms you may experience leading up to menopause when your periods stop for good. Most are mild, and may involve both the mind and body. Some can be so mild that you hesitate to even mention them to your doctor. Anxiety, bloating, and weight gain, and most of the other not-quite-well symptoms can be attributed to other things.

The first acknowledgement that there's something new happening for some women is that they don't feel the way they usually do, and they don't react in the same way. Situations they might have ignored, or not even noticed, suddenly provoke sleepless nights, mood swings, and even panic attacks.

If you're in your early forties, or even in your thirties, and are experiencing symptoms which seem to have arrived out of the blue, go and see your doctor. They may be a sign that you're going through the perimenopause.

The dreaded hot flash

Host flashes are the most common perimenopausal symptoms, and can make you severely uncomfortable. Women experience them both at night and during the day. If they occur at night, they may even wake you. Although you feel hot, your core temperature is actually going down, as you perspire and as increased blood flows to the skin. Some women experience the flushes as cooling sensations and feel chilled.

You can manage hot flashes during the day by drinking more water, wearing layers of natural fibre-clothing, so you can remove a layer when you're too hot. At night, ensure that your bedroom is cool and that your nightwear and bedding are natural cotton.

Sleep disorders

Sleeplessness and restless sleep is common during perimenopause. The lack of sleep can make you tired, irritable, and unable to concentrate. Night sweats can wake you from a deep sleep, and lead to several hours of lying awake.

The challenge with insomnia is that when you'd been unable to sleep for a couple of nights, you can become stressed at the idea that you won't be able to sleep, and the stress keeps you awake. Try to create a bedtime routine, during which you go to sleep at the same time every night, have a warm drink of decaffeinated coffee or herbal tea, and listen to soothing music to lull yourself to sleep.

Headaches

Headaches are often more common during perimenopause. If you've experienced headaches before and during your periods right throughout your life, you may find that the fluctuating hormones of perimenopause mean that you experience more headaches more often. Try herbal tea or herbal headache remedies to relieve your headaches.

The Challenge

The menopausal years can certainly hold some challenges, However, knowing what is behind the changes and taking control of your own health during these years can make all the difference in the world. The importance of reading all you can, asking your doctor pointed questions, and insisting on having a program tailored to your specific needs can't be overemphasized.

Focus on yourself for a change! This should be an exciting and uplifting phase of your life. Don't let troubling symptoms ruin it for you.

Dr. Martin Milner, ND is author of "The Menopause Revolution" As Medical Director for the Center for Natural Medicine Inc. he has helped thousands of women take control of their own health, balancing their hormones safely and naturally. Visit his site to find out more The Menopause Revolution

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Friday, November 2, 2007

Hot flashes and other common menopause symptoms

Menopause is a natural life process for women. It

usually occurs in your early or mid-forties, and,

unfortunately, it is accompanied by a number of

symptoms that can be quite concerning to most

women. Some women experience very few changes

during this time, while others report noticeable

symptoms. The more you know about menopause, the

better prepared you will be to manage any

menopause-related problems that might come your

way.

These symptoms can be an indication of menopause:

Achy joints - hot flashes - temporary and minor

decrease in the ability to concentrate or recall -

changes in sexual desire - extreme sweating -

headaches - frequent urination - early wakening -

vaginal dryness - mood changes - insomnia - night

sweats - conditions commonly associated with PMS

....

Also, increased allergies, rapid heart beats,

breast soreness, tenderness, sudden weight gain,

hair loss, electric shock sensation, in body or

head, osteoporosis, fatigues.

One of the first symptoms most women see in

menopause is irregular or missed periods. When

menopause starts to occur, the estrogen and

progesterone levels, stimulated by the ovaries,

are seriously decreased. This means that the

ovaries no longer get the signal to release the

egg, which means that a woman will often notice a

disruption in her normal monthly cycle.

Another common symptom of menopause is a hot

flash. More than seventy five percent of women who

go through menopause experience hot flashes, in

varying degrees of severity. This makes a woman

feel flush. For example, she can be standing in a

room that is only seventy degrees, but she will

overwhelmingly feel as if someone has turned the

temperature up to ninety degrees. In the very next

moment, though, she may feel as if the room is

only forty degrees, and she is suddenly shivering.

These hot flashes can be accompanied by other

symptoms like dizziness, heart palpitations, or

faintness. Most hot flashes last up to ten

minutes, but not all women experience them to that

terrible degree. Some women simply acknowledge

them and move on. Poor diet and stress levels in

the woman's body have been shown to have a

negative effect on the entire process. Most women

will experience this symptom for five to six

years, though some women have them for the ten to

twenty years prior and following menopause.

Hot flashes typically lead to another common

symptom of menopause, insomnia. Because hot

flashes can occur both during the day and through

the night, many women will find that they wake up

drenched in their own sweat. Often they must get

up to change their clothes and their sheets to

escape the level of sweat that the body has

produced. If a woman is a light sleeper anyway,

and most are after they have children, it can be

impossible for her to fall asleep again.

Interestingly enough, though, night sweats aren't

the only thing that cause these sleep

disturbances. The hormone levels in the blood also

have an effect on the quality of a woman's sleep.

Fixing these hormone levels can sometimes

eliminate sleep difficulties.

Learning to identify the common symptoms of

menopause can help you learn to deal with them on

a much healthier level. Be sure to contact your

doctor if any of your symptoms are causing serious

problems in your life.

Birgit Jurock lives in Roberts Creek on the

Sunshine Coast in British Columbia. Read more

articles about menopause at

http://www.naturalmenopausetreatments.com

Birgit Jurock lives in Roberts Creek on the

Sunshine Coast in British Columbia.

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Thursday, November 1, 2007

Natural Menopause Treatment

 Signs of Menopause


For more information please visit


  • Am I Menopausal?

  • Natural Menopause Relief

  • Menopause Symptoms

  • Defeating Menopause




  • Description


    * Menopause refers to the cessation of menses, a normal process in a woman's life. It marks the ending of a woman's reproductive years, and the beginning of a new stage of life known as the climacteric stage. Menopause usually occurs near the age of fifty, but can begin in the early forties.,


    * During menopause, the production of ovarian hormones, including androgens, decreases. This can result in signs of menopause, including hot flashes, mood swings, depression, vaginal dryness, excessive perspiration, headaches, memory impairment, digestive disturbances, and sleeplessness. At the time of menopause there is an increase in the production of androgens from other androgen-producing sites in the body. Androgens act as weak estrogens, helping the body to adjust to the hormonal changes that are occurring.


    * The stronger the woman's adrenals, and the better her nutritional status, the easier is her transition into menopause. Chronic stress over long periods of time can lead to adrenal depletion. If a woman is nutritionally depleted and emotionally stressed she may require hormonal, nutritional, or other support.2


    Prevention and Management of Signs of Menopause Symptoms


    * Regular physical exercise is necessary to protect against bone loss. Exercise has many other benefits as well.


    * A diet that is low in saturated fats and cholesterol and high in complex carbohydrates, such as grains, fruits and vegetables is important.2


    * Vitamin E supplementation may reduce symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, dizziness, palpitations, fatigue, and breathing difficulties.,,


    * Calcium is important in maintaining bone mass.
    * Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption.
    * Magnesium intake is often low in women with osteoporosis. Low magnesium intake is associated with low bone mineral content (BMC).


    * Boron reduces urinary calcium loss and increases serum levels of 17 estradiol (estrogen).


    * Essential fatty acids can help prevent dryness of the hair, skin and vaginal tissues.


    * Soy supplementation has been suggested as a possible alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Soy isoflavones act as estrogen-like compounds. Forty-five grams of dietary soy, per day for 12 weeks was shown to decrease post-menopausal hot flashes.


    * Certain herbs such as black cohosh, chasteberry, licorice and dong quai have shown to have a beneficial effect in managing many of the menopause symptoms.

    References

    1 Golan R. Optimal Wellness. New York:Ballantine Books; 1995 p 359-40.
    2 Mayo JL. A Natural Approach to Menopause. Clin Nutr Insights 1997;5(7):1-8.

     

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